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American Quilter's Society
PO Box 3290
Paducah, KY 42002-3290

Toll-free (for orders only, please):
1-800-626-5420
Phone: 270-898-7903
Fax: 270-898-1173

Physical Street Address for UPS/FedEx Shipments Only:
5801 Kentucky Dam Road Paducah, KY 42003-9323

Authors: Author List

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Shelley Hawkins

Shelley Hawkins

Shelley Hawkins grew up in a creative environment at her parents’ sewing store. She credits her skills to the infinite inspiration she received while working as an associate editor in the book division of American Quilter's Society.

Books by Shelley Hawkins

 
Dixie Haywood

Dixie Haywood

Dixie Haywood resides in Pensacola, Florida. She has been quilting for more than 40 years. Dixie also teaches and judges throughout the country and has authored over 150 articles and five books (three with Jane Hall). Published works include: "Firm Foundations" and "Foundation Borders."

Books by Dixie Haywood

 
Ann Hazelwood

Ann Hazelwood

Ann Hazelwood has written several books for the American Quilter’s Society including "100 Things You Need to Know If You Own a Quilt," "100 Tips from Award-winning Quilters," and "100 Sweet Treats by and for Quilters." A former quilt shop owner, Ann is an author of regional food and travel books about her home state of Missouri, and is an AQS-certified quilt appraiser and President of the National Quilt Museum’s Board of Directors. "The Basement Quilt" is her first work of fiction, soon to be followed by "The Potting Shed Quilt" and "The Funeral Parlor Quilt."

Website: http://www.booksonthings.com

Books by Ann Hazelwood

 

Carl Hentsch

Carl Hentsch grew up on the east coast of Florida. He learned to embroider from his mother when he was 10. At the age of 12 he was designing dresses for his two-year old niece, and helping his mother make them. He also learned knitting from his aunt.

In 1999, Carl started quilting. He learned by watching Eleanor Burns, Alex Anderson, and Fons and Porter on TV. After a two-year lull, Carl moved to the Kansas City area and picked up his quilting in 2006. He has had original designs displayed in AQS shows in Knoxville and Des Moines, as well as a traveling quilt with the 2010 Hoffman Challenge. Carl teaches quilting at local quilt shops and has self-published two patterns, Leap Frog and Evergreen. He also had a pattern featured in Issue 10 of The Fat Quarterly.

Carl has degrees in biology, chemistry, accounting, and linguistics. He has traveled the US extensively and also the Orient. To support his quilting habit, he has a day job marketing computer software.

Website: http://www.3DogDesignCo.com

Books by Carl Hentsch

 
Dianne S. Hire

Dianne S. Hire

Dianne S. Hire, a 20-year transplant from Tennessee to Belfast, Maine, is an award-winning fiber artist, quiltmaker, teacher, lecturer, and international exhibitor. Dianne pushes boundaries! She inspires students to go beyond themselves to a place where they’ve been before.

About her jump to appliqué—it was something she really didn’t know much about when she began. She states, “My goal is to inspire creativity in much the same way as I’ve done for straight and curved piecing. The wonderful task of taking a traditional quiltmaking element to a slightly new design plan, bending toward a whole set of what ifs, and allowing minds to wander.”

Books by Dianne S. Hire

 

Pat Holly

Pat has been sewing almost her whole life, beginning with sewing clothes as a young girl. She is a graphic artist and attended the University of Michigan School of Art & Design. She also spends time volunteering for her daughter's theater endeavors, including costume work for local productions. Pat and her sister, Sue Nickels, enjoy working together on quilts as well as patterns and books. They live about a three-hour drive from each other and find creative ways to manage working together on projects. Sue travels extensively, teaching machine techniques, and Pat will join Sue occasionally, especially for international trips. This has been a wonderful working relationship. Pat and Sue work so well together because they both love the connection with quilters of the past and enjoy the technology of today.

Books by Pat Holly

 
Ann R. Holmes

Ann R. Holmes

Ann Holmes, stained glass artist and quilter, has been producing site-specific stained glass since 1976. Public glass commissions include several churches and the skylight in the Lyon business building in Batesville, Arkansas. In Asheville, North Carolina, she designed and built windows for the Asheville Area Arts Council and the Grove Park Inn. In 1999, Ann became involved with the Asheville Quilt Guild and had a desire to recreate some of her original glass designs into fabric without the lead line look of stained glass quilts.

Ann prefers the look of a turned edge, so she applied what she learned from hand appliqué to include the background where every patch or piece in her designs is built using a glue stick to turn the edges instead of using needle and thread. In the early stages of developing her technique, she would build a small section of the top and then take it to the sewing machine to stitch. In 2005, foot surgery forced her to think of a new method to finish her project to meet the deadline for the Asheville Quilt Show. She asked herself, “Why am I sewing this twice, once for stitching the top and a second time for quilting?” No Sewing Until You Quilt It, Ann’s turned under appliqué technique, was the result.

Books by Ann R. Holmes

 
Peggy Holt

Peggy Holt

Peggy has been quilting since the revival of the craft in the early 1970s. Her sewing career began at the age of nine with a project in 4-H—the common gathered apron. Although she dabbled in the usual crafts of the seventies and eighties, quilting continued to become more and more important. As other avenues of creative expression fell by the wayside, Peggy became a full-fledged quilter. Today Peggy’s quilts are more likely to have innovative techniques and include intricate piecing or experimental techniques. She loves pushing the envelope using unconventional materials such as metals, paints, plastics, and fibers. Peggy began her longarm custom quilting business in 1997 and is mostly self-taught. She teaches quilting classes and enjoys making presentations at local and regional guilds and other organizations. In 2003 Peggy was privileged to speak to a group of teachers in the Czech Republic. She also judges at local fairs and shows. Peggy’s quilts have received numerous awards including Best of Show. Her quilts have been juried into International Quilt Festival, Houston, and International Quilt Festival, Chicago. She has also had quilts displayed at MQX and Innovations, as well as at various local and regional shows.

Previous publications include an article for “Quilting Arts” magazine and inclusion in “Beautifully Embellished Landscapes” by Joyce Becker (C & T Publishing, 2001) and Renae Haddadin’s “Amazing Ways to Use Circles & Rays” (AQS, 2010). Peggy and her husband Bill live in a valley of the Rocky Mountains of western Montana where Peggy is active in guild, church, and community chorus activities. They have one son and two grandchildren. You can visit Peggy’s website at www.quiltrelated.weebly.com.

Website: http://www.quiltrelated.weebly.com

Books by Peggy Holt

 
Barbara Holtzman

Barbara Holtzman

Barbara’s mother taught her to sew while she was in junior high and she used that skill to make clothes for a long time. Her first quilting project was a hand-pieced bed quilt that took over five years to complete. Then her attention became focused on small quilts, especially miniature quilts. Because she has a full-time job and enjoys sewing, the idea of making a small quilt appealed to her. She could actually finish that! Plus it’s fun to display the quilts on a wall and admire them (and have them admired!). As Barbara made more quilts, her attention was drawn to the competition side of quilting. Trying to make a quilt good enough to enter into competition helped her get better at piecing, quilting, and all aspects of making a quilt. The design element drew her in because it is another way to be creative. Barbara is able to pick a simple, easy quilt or a complicated design. It’s the whole process she enjoys––from picking out the fabric to putting on that last stitch in the binding.

Books by Barbara Holtzman

 
Brenna Hopkins

Brenna Hopkins

Published works include: "Embroidered Childhood Memories" coauthored with Nori Koenig.

Books by Brenna Hopkins

 
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