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American Quilter's Society
PO Box 3290
Paducah, KY 42002-3290

Toll-free (for orders only, please):
1-800-626-5420
Phone: 270-898-7903
Fax: 270-898-1173

Physical Street Address for UPS/FedEx Shipments Only:
5801 Kentucky Dam Road Paducah, KY 42003-9323

Quilting Community AQS Authors

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Karen Linduska

Karen Linduska

Karen is a full-time award-winning fiber artist, author, and teacher and considers herself very lucky because she gets to make art quilts for a living and write about what she loves to do. She states, “I get to teach in a field where people are happy and excited about learning. For me it’s all about moving forward in a positive direction and sharing the knowledge that flows out of me.” Karen loves sharing her fiber art and is amazed to see someone who is very exact at the beginning of class open up and let loose by the end.

"Creative Uses for Decorative Stitches" is Karen's second book. She also writes articles, sells kits and patterns, and teaches all over the country in stores and at quilting guilds. You can contact Karen via her website: www.KarenLinduska.com

Books by Karen Linduska

 
Toby Lischko

Toby Lischko

Toby was born to quilt! Her mother is a retired home economics teacher and her grandfather was a tailor. A crafter from an early age, who has tried every craft imaginable, from knitting, crocheting, tatting, needlepoint, cross stitch, English smocking,
and macramé to name a few. Whatever craft was in vogue she tried. She started sewing her own clothes when she was 12. She even designed and sewed her own wedding gown. She enjoyed each of
those crafts but eventually got bored and moved on to another.

Toby took her first quilting class in 1985, along with her mother, from the renowned quilter Jackie Robinson, who owned a local quilt shop in St. Louis, Missouri. It was during summer vacation from her job as a special education teacher and after the six-week class she got the quilting bug. In 1995 she started working in a quilt shop, began teaching quilting classes, and designing her own quilts. She was then asked to lecture and hold workshops with local quilt guilds. She also began to enter quilt contests. “I finally found a craft that was continually evolving and I was evolving with it. It is never boring!”

In 1998 she had her first quilt on the cover of Miniature Quilt Magazine, and won her first contest with the Hoffman Challenge, she was hooked! In 2001 she began to work with fabric companies and magazines, designing quilts and writing articles.
In 2007, she retired from education and began concentrating on her quilting career, setting some high goals: to win a ribbon for a quilt in the American Quilter’s Society Quiltweek®–Paducah,
Kentucky; to teach at a national venue, and to write a book.

In 2005 she won a first place prize in the First Entry, Wall division for her “masterpiece” Celestial Crowns, at the AQS Quiltweek®–Paducah, which was also featured in the AQS 2006 calendar. She wrote her first book, St. Louis Stars in 2008. She has taught in many national quilt shows including IQA in Houston, Texas; AQS Quiltweek®–Paducah, Kentucky and Des Moines, Iowa; National Quilting Association, Original Sewing and Quilting Expo, and Machine Quilter’s Expo.

An award winning quilter, pattern designer, author, and quilt teacher she enjoys the whole process. “I love taking a group of fabrics and creating a unique design that shows off the collection.” Her skill and her unique style have been recognized by many of the major fabric companies, such as Timeless Treasures, Hoffman, Clothworks, Benartex, RJR, and P&B, who regularly commission her to design quilts for them.

Her teaching style is tempered from her years as a special education teacher, and her students have told her that she teaches to the quilters’ styles, helping them understand even the most difficult techniques. They always come away from her workshops saying, “I didn’t know I could do that!”

“I like to inspire quilters to go that one step beyond their everyday quilting and try something new. I don’t think that there are any quilters who can not do what I do if they want to.” She teaches techniques that students can use in any of their quilting projects. Her lectures and trunk shows give quilters ideas on how to approach their fabrics and blocks in non conventional ways. She feels that there is an artist in everyone and they just need to find their niche, which is what she did when she started quilting. “Fabrics are my palette and the quilts are my paintings.”

She considers herself a traditional quilter with a twist. “I use traditional blocks to create quilts that look difficult but that anyone can make.” Her use of fabrics in the quilts can change the whole look of a traditional block. Her patterns and designs can be found in quilt shops, on the web, and in many of the national quilting magazines such as McCall’s Quilting, McCall’s Quick Quilts, Fons and Porter, The Quilter, Quilter’s Newsletter, Quiltmaker, and Quilt. She was a featured artist in Miniature Quilts and wrote articles for Quilter’s World.

She lives in the rural area of Beaufort, Missouri, with her husband Mike of 43 years, a Marine Corp, Vietnam Veteran, one dog and six cats. She runs her own business, Gateway Quilts & Stuff, Inc. and has a website www.gatewayquiltsnstuff.com where she sells her patterns and templates, and where her workshop descriptions can be found. She hopes that many readers, from beginners to accomplished quilters, will enjoy this book and find inspiration on every page.

Website: http://www.gatewayquiltsnstuff.com/

Books by Toby Lischko

 
Bobbie McClure Long

Bobbie McClure Long

Bobbie comes from a long line of quilters and/or seamstresses and owns several family-made antique quilts. Making things has always been a part of her life. Beautiful clothes made for her by her mother and aunt were the norm, and quilts were on the beds of her home as she was growing up. Bobbie continued that tradition by making clothes for her daughters when they were young. As her kids grew up, they were surprised to learn that everyone’s mom didn’t do that. Even then, Bobbie’s best work was in the embellishments and details.

She has gone from asking if it was OK to have her quilt square look more like a rectangle than a square, to having quilts win multiple ribbons at regional quilt shows and travel with national exhibits. In addition, she enjoys photography, computer graphic arts, and painting, all of which she sometimes includes in her quilts.

She is happily married to her best friend, Tom. They live in the Pocono Mountains of northeastern Pennsylvania with their granddog, Juno. Bobbie has four adult daughters; three sons-in-law; four adult stepsons; four stepdaughters-in-law; and between Bobbie and Tom they have twelve grandchildren.

Books by Bobbie McClure Long

 
Eula M. Long

Eula M. Long

Born in Prescott, Iowa, as the only girl of seven children, Eula Mae Long learned sewing from her mother. It was her task to hand sew the small squares together which her mother then made into quilts. In high school, Eula Mae took home economics all four years to learn as much about sewing as possible. She received her first sewing machine (a treadle model) as a gift from her mother-in-law and turned out much of her children's clothing. Eula Mae taught sewing classes to 4-H clubs and adults for many years, focusing on clothing design. Then, for a change of pace, she took a course in quilting in Riverside, California, and three years later was asked to help teach quilting at McKinley School in Salem, Oregon. It wasn't until 1989 that Eula Mae began to applique and draw some of her own designs. She found there was a great need for applique designs suited for beginners and older women who had trouble handling the small pieces in most designs. That's when she decided to put her easier designs into a book.

 
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